Training, Drilling, and Exercising Toolkit

2.8 Drill Guidance Job-Aids

The Drill Guidance Job-Aids are response tools that should be incorporated into the drill process. Tools such as these may help facilitate efficient and effective drills. All drill feedback should be used to update plans and guidelines and tailor the job-aids to your school needs.

Drill and Exercise Documentation Form

The Drill and Exercise Documentation Tool provides schools with the ability to document drill and exercise activities throughout the school year. In addition, this tool helps schools to identify objectives to be tested and lessons learned from the each drill and exercise conducted.

Drill and Exercise Documentation Form

Drill Tracking Form

Retaining documentation of drills conducted at each campus is important both for lessons learned and for ongoing self-assessment and audit processes. A document such as the Preparedness Drill Tracking Form is a good way to track drill progress.

Drill Tracking Form

Fire Drill Exit Report Form

The Fire Drill Exit Report form (SF242) is mandated by the Texas Insurance Commissioner through the adoption of the “Texas Addendum to the Fire Suppression Rating Schedule”. This schedule details specific credit points used in calculating local insurance rates. Specifically, information collected in this form is combined with that of other schools served by a specific fire department, and used to calculate insurance rates for the community in which the school resides. A minimum of nine (9) drills is needed (one per month for each month having 10 school days or more) to achieve full credit for fire drills. If a school schedule has more than nine (9) months with 10 or more school days, a drill is needed for each additional month (e.g., a summer school program that includes 10 or more days for the same program at the same campus). Conducting fire drills and fire prevention education not only has the potential to lower insurance rates for community residents, but also enhance safety for students. Campus administrators shall conduct regular fire drills, in compliance with Fire Exit Drill requirements (i.e., Texas Education Agency Government Code 61.1036 Section 3, (F); International Fire Code, Chapter 4, Emergency Planning and Preparedness; NFPA 101, Fire Safety Code, Chapter 15.7.2, Emergency Egress Drills and Chapter 4.7.6, Fire Drills (2006, 2009, 2012 editions); and/or the National Fire Protection Association Life Safety Code 101, 2012 edition. Each campus should complete this form and keep it in school/district records for three years. Do not send these forms to the State Fire Marshal’s Office.

Fire Drill Exit Report Form

Planning and Evaluation Tools

Do not conduct a drill simply for the purpose of fulfilling a requirement. Utilize the Emergency Drill Planning Checklist to address the following questions: Will the drill test general response? Will evacuation be involved? Will it focus upon students with special needs? Will communications be tested? Will more than one scenario be tested? Will the drill be announced so staff is ready or will it be a surprise? Who will follow up?

Given the variety of functions that may be tested, there is no set way to run a drill. Before starting any drill, ensure that conditions are right. If operational procedures are being tested, review them beforehand and ensure that office staff is made aware. Review safety precautions and have a system in place to stop the drill should conditions merit. Have a system ready that allows everyone some level of input to evaluate the drill. For example, students provide conversational or written assignment input to teachers; teachers then share student input as well as their own with team leaders or administrators; non-faculty staff share input with immediate supervisor or administrators; administrators then review input and work with district administration, district safety department, and/or with first responders. The Campus Feedback Form is a tool that can allow for input to evaluate the drill.

In addition to after action reviews, which use the input of students, faculty and staff to assess each drill, other opportunities exist to collect drill feedback. One of the most valuable methods involves an evaluator. It is the responsibility of the evaluator to look at the drill objectives and then to determine whether, as part of the drill or exercise, the campus achieved its objectives. The results can be shared with the administrator and/or incorporated into the after action review process. This Emergency Drill Evaluator Checklist is particularly valuable when working with first responders or other entities that may not be familiar with school emergency plans and procedures. This form builds upon the Emergency Drill Planning Checklist.

Planning and Evaluation Tools

Sample Drill & Exercise Guidance

Since drill are more than moving students and staff from one location to another, the following guidance is designed for schools to tailor to the threats and needs of their communities. The guidance provides recommendations to consider as part of the drill processes.

Sample Drill & Exercise Guidance